The H-2A temporary agricultural program establishes a means for agricultural employers who anticipate a shortage of domestic workers to bring nonimmigrant foreign workers to the U.S. to perform agricultural labor or services of a temporary or seasonal nature. Before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can approve an employer's petition for such workers, the employer must file an application with the Department stating that there are not sufficient workers who are able, willing, qualified, and available, and that the employment of aliens will not adversely affect the wages and working conditions of similarly employed U.S. workers. The statute and Departmental regulations provide for numerous worker protections and employer requirements with respect to wages and working conditions that do not apply to nonagricultural programs.

The Department's Wage and Hour Division, Employment Standards Administration (ESA) has responsibility for enforcing provisions of worker contracts.

"Temporary or seasonal nature" means employment performed at certain seasons of the year, usually in relation to the production and/or harvesting of a crop, or for a limited time period of less than one year when an employer can show that the need for the foreign workers(s) is truly temporary.

The following general categories of individuals or organizations may file an application:

  • An agricultural employer who anticipates a shortage of U.S. workers needed to perform agricultural labor or services of a temporary or seasonal nature, may file an application requesting temporary foreign agricultural labor certification. "Temporary or seasonal nature" means employment performed at certain seasons of the year, usually in relation to the production and/or harvesting of a crop, or for a limited time period of less than one year when an employer can show that the need for the foreign worker(s) is truly temporary.
  • The employer may be an individual proprietorship, a partnership or a corporation. An association of agricultural producers may file as a sole employer, a joint employer with its members, or as an agent of its members.
  • An authorized agent, whether an individual (e.g., and attorney) or an entity (e.g., an association), may file an application on behalf of an employer. Associations may file master applications on behalf of their members.

Many of the benefits that must be included in a job offer and other conditions that must be satisfied will be dependent upon what prevailing practices exist in the same occupation, crop and area. Employers are advised that it is desirable to make an independent determination of factors such as prevailing wages and employer practices before filing an application.

An employer who files an application for temporary foreign labor certification pursuant to H-2A regulations must meet the following specific conditions:

The employer must agree to engage in independent positive recruitment of U.S. workers. This means an active effort, including newspaper advertising in the area of intended employment. Such recruitment must be at least equivalent to that conducted by non-H-2A agricultural employers in the same or similar crops and area to secure U.S. workers. This must be an effort independent of and in addition to the efforts of the SWA. In establishing worker qualifications and/or job specifications, the employer must designate only those qualifications and specifications which are essential to carrying out the job and which are normally required by other employers who do not hire foreign workers.

The wage or rate of pay must be the same for U.S. workers and H-2A workers. The hourly rate must also be at least as high as the applicable Adverse Effect Wage Rate (AEWR), federal or state minimum wage, or the applicable prevailing hourly wage rate, whichever is higher. The AEWR is established every year by the Department of Labor for every state except Alaska. Employers should consult with the SWA or the Department of Labor’s Chicago National Processing Center to determine what the rate is for their state. If a worker will be paid on a piece rate basis, the worker must be paid the prevailing piece as determined by the SWA. If the piece rate does not result in average hourly piece rate earnings during the pay period at least equal to the amount the worker would have earned had the worker been paid at the hourly rate, then the worker’s pay must be supplemented to the equivalent hourly level. The piece rate offered must be no less than what is prevailing in the area for the same crop and/or activity.

The employer must provide either three meals a day to each worker or furnish free and convenient cooking and kitchen facilities for workers to prepare their own meals. If meals are provided, then the employer may charge each worker a certain amount per day for the three meals.

The amount of transportation payment shall be no less (and shall not be required to be more) than the most economical and reasonable similar common carrier transportation charges for the distances involved. The employer is responsible for the following different types of transportation of workers: (1) After a worker has completed fifty percent of the work contract period, the employer must reimburse the worker for the cost of transportation and subsistence from the place of recruitment to the place of work if such costs were borne by the worker. (2) The employer must provide free transportation between the employer's housing and the worksite for any worker who is provided housing. (3) Upon completion of the work contract, the employer must pay economic costs of a worker's subsistence and return transportation to the place of recruitment. Special conditions apply when the worker will not be returning to the place of recruitment because of another job. If the employer must advance transportation costs to foreign workers or provide transportation, the employer must advance such costs or provide transportation to U.S. workers as well. In addition, if it is prevailing practice in the occupation to provide transportation, the employer must provide transportation to U.S. workers, as well.

The employer must provide workers' compensation insurance where it is required by state law. Where state law does not require it, the employer must provide equivalent insurance for all workers. Proof of insurance coverage must be provided to the Chicago National Processing Center before certification is granted.

The employer must furnish at no cost to the worker all tools and supplies necessary to carry out the work, unless it is common practice in the area and occupation for the worker to provide certain items.

The employer must guarantee to offer each worker employment for at least three-fourths of the workdays in the work contract period and any extensions. If the employer affords less employment, then the employer must pay the amount which the worker would have earned had the worker been employed the guaranteed number of days.

The employer must hire any qualified and eligible U.S. worker who applies for a job until fifty percent (50%) of the period of the work contract has elapsed. However, the fifty percent rule does not apply to a small employer who did not use more than “five hundred man days of agricultural labor” (as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) during any calendar quarter of theprevious year and is not a member of an association which has applied for H-2A workers.

The employer must assure that the job opportunity for which H-2A certification is being requested is not vacant because the former occupant is on strike or is being locked out in the course of a labor dispute.

A fee will be charged to an employer granted temporary foreign agricultural, labor certification. The fee is $100, plus $10 for each job opportunity certified, up to a maximum fee of $1,000 for each certification granted.

The employer must keep accurate records with respect to a worker's earnings. The worker must be provided with a complete statement of hours worked and related earnings on each payday. The employer must pay the worker at least twice monthly or more frequently if it is the prevailing practice to do so. The employer must provide a copy of a work contract or the job order to each worker.





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